The future of work for provider supply chain executives

Part 3: Embracing technological solutions and digital workforce

Posted by Eileen Radis, Paul Kreder, Jen Brown, Paul Atkins, and Kurt Banas on Febuary 20, 2020.

The future of work encompasses changes in work, in the workforce, and in the workplace. In preparation for these changes, supply chain executives will need to identify innovative ways to become an agile organization. This can be accomplished through the combination of empowered organizational design, robust talent strategies and implementing innovative technologies.  Reimagining supply chain will prepare leaders with the insights needed to proactively prepare for the future of healthcare and further help their workforce to operate at the top of their license.   This blog will focus on three strategies to help supply chain executives prepare to make the shift in future of work: (1) digitizing supply chain (2) activating automation and (3) optimizing the workforce.

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Transforming the supply chain for health care providers Part 2

Part 2: Unlocking critical capabilities in supply chain through an operating model transformation

Posted by Eileen Radis, Lynn Gonsor, Paul Atkins, and Kurt Banas on January 15, 2020. 

In Part 1 of our series, we looked at how supply chain is rapidly becoming a key strategic function across the health care provider ecosystem. Today, we discuss unlocking critical capabilities in the supply chain through an operating model transformation.

Only 38 percent of executives say they are very or extremely confident that their supply chain organization has the capabilities it needs today.[i] This fact is garnering significant attention in the health care sector, as more business leaders begin to understand the strategic significance of supply chain as a powerful way to impact the bottom line and prepare for the Future of Work. As a result, savvy supply chain executives should be focused on developing high-performing, adaptable teams to be able to create and deliver more-advanced supply chain capabilities and drive value. This often requires reorganizing the function from the top down through an operating model transformation, which we loosely define as ensuring the right skills, in the right place, in the right amounts, at the right time. Basically, you can’t drive innovative and leading-edge approaches through ineffective decision rights, structures that are dated, and a view of supply chain that is merely transactional.

To provide executives with an overview of what a supply chain operating model transformation might entail, this post touches on three topics: (1) supply chain capabilities needed in the future, (2) operating model components that should be considered in times of transformation, and (3) the factors that can  make a supply chain transformation achieve the expected results.

 

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Transforming the supply chain for health care providers

Part 1: Making sense of a complex web

Posted by Eileen Radis, Paul Atkins, and Kurt Banas on December 17, 2019.

Supply chain is rapidly becoming a key strategic function across the health care provider ecosystem,  with a seat at the C-suite table. Providers increasingly recognize that an effective and efficient supply chain can improve the quality of care delivered to patients and generate significant cost savings for their organization. And they can see that trends such as cloud Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP), automation, and analytics are driving how supply chain is evolving and how this can generate even more benefits. In this series, we’ll look at how health care providers can tackle the challenges associated with supply chain transformation, starting with why an all-in approach that accounts for the supply chain’s many interdependencies is essential. Continue reading “Transforming the supply chain for health care providers”