Using goals to drive productivity: Set the STAGE!

Posted by Kathi Enderes and Nehal Nangia on October 17, 2019.

Let’s imagine that you’re focusing on your health and fitness and want to incorporate walking into your daily routine. Without setting a goal of how many steps to take every day, you’ll likely not get better at walking more, and without monitoring your progress along the way, you won’t know if you’re achieving your goal. The same is true for performance management—and the stakes are higher, considering that this is an activity that feeds into your career, growth, and compensation. If you aren’t clear on what you’re trying to achieve and aren’t getting regular updates on your progress, it will be difficult for you to be productive—hence the business case for goals.
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Why performance goals matter—and 4 strategies to improve them

Posted by Kathi Enderes on August 6, 2019.

Who hasn’t set a goal to get more fit, learn a new language, or take a dream vacation? We frequently use goals in our personal lives because they help us stay focused on the things we want to achieve. Sometimes we set goals but we aren’t quite ready to achieve them. If you haven’t exercised in a few years, running 10 miles your first time back in sneakers might be overly ambitious. But a 10-mile run could be totally achievable with the right preparation. Just like individuals, organizations use goals to stay focused and achieve success. And just like individuals, organizations sometimes set goals that don’t lead to the outcomes they want or expect. But, the right prep work can get them there.

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How technology can democratize people analytics

Posted by Kathi Enderes, and Matthew Shannon on June 27, 2019.

If you could look into the future and see which decisions will have the greatest impact on your organization’s business outcomes, would you? Undoubtedly, most people would answer with a resounding, “Yes!”” Organizations have an abundance of people data, and many understand they need to use that information for improved performance and productivity. But while analytics technology has advanced, global productivity remains weak, contributing to a gap between the possible and the actual, with no easy way to close it.

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Does fear prevent learning in the flow of work?

Posted by Julie Hiipakka and Jeff Mike on May 15, 2019.

We recently attended Deloitte’s 2019 Chief Learning Officer Forum, where a number of learning leaders discussed the idea of feeling “safe” and its impact on workers. One participant made a great point: the very people we rely on to implement change in our organizations—middle managers—often experience heavy financial burdens due to aging parents, children’s college tuition, and/or debts carried over from past mortgages or higher education. A need for financial safety, he posited, might prevent the very experimentation and agility we want from our workers. Their need for job security could override any desire to take risks, innovate, or experiment in the flow of work.1 (A recent Deloitte survey found that financial topics like job security, retirement, and debt are among top employee stressors. Our colleague Pete DeBellis wrote on how to address this via a rewards strategy.)2

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Prediction: People analytics will augment the workforce and the workplace


Posted by Kathi Enderes on December 4, 2018.

Ninety percent of the data in the world has been created within the last two years alone, and the continued emergence of new technologies will likely increase that rate even more. HR leaders have been attempting for years to use people analytics to turn this vast amount of data into actionable insights, but many still struggle with how and where to apply people analytics to maximize the return on investment. In the coming year, more and more organizations will start to apply people analytics in a new way, with a direct focus on the individual, rather than through HR or leaders—a bottom-up approach, as opposed to just top-down.

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Prediction: HR will mobilize around productivity


Posted by Jeff Mike and Denise Moulton on November 28, 2018.

Organizations across the board continue to face demographic, technological, and social disruptions throughout their ecosystems. Unrelenting market demands and the rise of the social enterprise1 require unprecedented levels of collaboration among increasing numbers of internal and external stakeholders. In this context, HR must accelerate its evolution from a service-oriented support function to an essential business contributor that routinely measures its success in terms of business impact and workforce outcomes.

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Predictions for 2019: The productivity imperative


Posted by David Mallon on November 27, 2018.

If there is one line that sums up the outlook for HR in 2019, it might be that backhanded blessing, “May you live in interesting times.” These are interesting times, indeed. The increasingly influential role of social capital in organizational success is compelling companies to reimagine their purpose and redefine what it means to be a good citizen, internally and externally. In this new social enterprise, more collaborative and productive relationships with employees, customers, and communities go hand in hand with the quest for revenue and profit.1

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Pay for performance works — Here’s why


Posted by Kathi Enderes on November 12, 2018.

“Science confirms: people are not pets,” claims a recent article.1 The key finding of this piece was also the topic of the book Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us, by Daniel H. Pink,2 which asserts that people cannot bribe others into doing what they want. Study after study has confirmed that attempts to motivate people with extrinsic rewards to perform better, work harder, or behave differently tend to be fruitless at best—and are often counterproductive. So why do so many organizations still use the old “pay for performance” moniker? Why do they spend hours and hours designing systems to evaluate performance and differentiate performance levels with rewards?

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Looking beyond engagement and into worker passion

Looking beyond engagement and into worker passion

Posted by John Hagel III and Maggie Wooll on August 10, 2017.

We are in the early stages of a shift from a global economy focused on angst, fear, and erosion of trust to one defined by creativity, curiosity, imagination, and social intelligence. To make this shift successful requires a broad shift in how institutions engage with employees and embrace the future of work.

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You can’t turn off the fire hose, but you can control the pressure

Overwhelmed employee

Posted by Tom Hodson on May 9, 2014

If I had to pick the one Global Human Capital Trends 2014 that generates the most head nods of understanding it would be the trend of the overwhelmed employee. People seem to universally understand and share the feeling that being “always on” is taking its toll, but often seem at a loss about what to do about it. To many, the problem seems unsolvable. Here’s a look at how we got here and what the future might hold for controlling the information overload that hampers productivity, performance, and ultimately happiness.

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