Putting big data to work

Organizational Network Analysis helps reveal insights “hiding in plain sight” in untapped email data


Posted by Greg Szwartz and Nikola Andric on November 13, 2018.

We recently had the opportunity to work with a leading global Life Sciences company to leverage some of its “dark” email-based metadata. This is data that companies generally don’t tap into, let alone turn into valuable information. What we found yielded surprising insights into how the organization and its people work and interact. This knowledge can now be applied to fuel an insights-driven High-Impact HR operating model—with a more systematic and quantified perspective on ways to boost new employee success, reduce turnover, and lift the overall productivity of the entire organization. Here’s how it happened.

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Strategic onboarding

Helping new hires succeed

Posted by Bill Cleary on October 8, 2018.

An effective new-hire experience can contribute to an employee’s productivity and create value for the organization. Studies show that effective onboarding can improve retention rates by 52 percent, time to productivity by 60 percent, and overall customer satisfaction by 53 percent1. For new hires, effective onboarding can increase both job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Despite this, the most common approaches to onboarding often fail.2

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Getting strategic about onboarding

Getting strategic about onboarding

Posted by Amy A. Titus and Josh Haims on March 27, 2014

I (Amy) remember my first day on a new job — it was 1999. I walked into my office, had a computer put in front me, and was promptly whisked off to take care of formalities like fingerprinting and drug testing. That was my onboarding. Fortunately, we’ve come a long way in the last 15 years. Today onboarding is recognized as a critically important talent strategy because it can dramatically affect both “hard” factors such as productivity, retention, and costs and those elusive “soft” factors such as employer reputation and referrals that can be a tremendous advantage in a tight talent market.

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Social Business: What’s On Your Mind?

MIT SMR

Posted on November 6, 2013

Maybe you’ll find that social business has a role to play in resolving your issues and meeting important business objectives, or maybe you won’t. But if you’re like 75 percent of your HR colleagues who responded to our survey and believe social business can fundamentally change the way we work, it’s worth exploring the possibilities. Social networking can provide instant access to people and information throughout the world, giving business the opportunity to engage with customers and connect employees in ways never before imaginable. So why are some businesses benefitting more than others? And how are they benefitting? What kinds of enterprises are benefitting the most?

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Social Business: What It Can Mean for HR

Social Business: What It Can Mean for HR

Posted by Doug Palmer on September 19, 2013

The second annual Deloitte and MIT Sloan Management Review (MIT SMR) research study continues our exploration of the social business landscape and how organizations are changing how work gets done by embedding social capabilities into processes and workflows. Three-quarters of the HR professionals who participated in the research (vs. 70% for all respondents) believe social business is an opportunity to “fundamentally change the way we work.” Tellingly, however, HR’s usage of social business still trails other functions. Only 14% of respondents from HR reported their organization’s use of social business in HR to a great extent vs. 46% of marketing respondents and 31% of customer service respondents. We think this points to a real opportunity for HR, as we see many ways social business can be used to enhance primary HR functions.

The uses of social business in HR span internal areas such as learning and development and external areas such as recruiting and staffing. Over the past year, survey respondents overall reported increasing use of social business in two specific areas of HR: identifying expertise (17% reporting an increase) and managing talent (14% reporting an increase). HR respondents themselves reported that their department uses social business most often in recruiting/managing talent (39%).

Which uses of SB have increased within your organization within the last 12 months? (Respondents selected up to 3)

The somewhat broad uses of social business in HR can be broken down as follows:

  • Recruiting — A variety of social tools like LinkedIn and Twitter help companies find and attract top talent. Some companies, including Covance, which was interviewed for our study, leverage these tools to establish relationships with potential candidates throughout the hiring cycle, even during the earliest stages when candidates simply want to understand what it would be like to work for that company.
  • Hiring/Staffing — Not everyone has to be inside the organization. In the Open Talent Economy, the 2013 Human Capital Trends report authored by my Deloitte colleagues Andy Liakopoulos, Jeff Schwartz, and Lisa Barry, talent resides on a continuum ranging from full-time employees to open source communities that support a company’s business objectives.
  • Onboarding — Collaboration tools like Chatter and Yammer help get people acclimated and connected to others in the organization much faster, driving increased productivity for the organization. Gamification can also be used to educate new employees about the organization and engage them more fully.
  • Learning/Development — Some of these same social collaboration and gamification tools not only have implications for how a company structures and delivers learning, but also how employees access colleagues to get help and learn in a just-in-time way.
  • Performance Management — Companies are building tools that provide more real-time capability to capture employees’ contributions, connections, and reputations — and their impact — vs. only on a six-month or annual cycle.

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