Pay for performance works — Here’s why


Posted by Kathi Enderes on November 12, 2018.

“Science confirms: people are not pets,” claims a recent article.1 The key finding of this piece was also the topic of the book Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us, by Daniel H. Pink,2 which asserts that people cannot bribe others into doing what they want. Study after study has confirmed that attempts to motivate people with extrinsic rewards to perform better, work harder, or behave differently tend to be fruitless at best—and are often counterproductive. So why do so many organizations still use the old “pay for performance” moniker? Why do they spend hours and hours designing systems to evaluate performance and differentiate performance levels with rewards?

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Getting strategic about onboarding

Getting strategic about onboarding

Posted by Amy A. Titus and Josh Haims on March 27, 2014

I (Amy) remember my first day on a new job — it was 1999. I walked into my office, had a computer put in front me, and was promptly whisked off to take care of formalities like fingerprinting and drug testing. That was my onboarding. Fortunately, we’ve come a long way in the last 15 years. Today onboarding is recognized as a critically important talent strategy because it can dramatically affect both “hard” factors such as productivity, retention, and costs and those elusive “soft” factors such as employer reputation and referrals that can be a tremendous advantage in a tight talent market.

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