Deconstructing Employee Experience

Posted by Madhura Chakrabarti on June 25, 2018.

Business and HR leaders are acutely aware of the importance of employee experience and the influential effect it has on organizational performance and results. Eighty percent of the HR and business leaders who participated in the Deloitte 2017 Human Capital Trends survey said that employee experience was “important” or “very important” to them. The problem: Only about one in five respondents (22 percent) said their organization was “excellent” at establishing a differentiated employee experience.1

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Middle Managers Will Always Be the Strategic Linchpin of Your Organization—Make Sure You Look After Them


Posted by Andrea Derler on March 8, 2018.

Middle management seems to be going out of fashion in many businesses. As organizations become flatter and senior executives want to be more involved in daily business operations, middle management is sometimes thought of as an inconvenience. Getting rid of the middle layer, some say, will help shed operating costs, enable employees to make their own decisions more often, and hence lead to higher productivity and engagement in the workforce.1

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Prediction 6: Senior leaders will work on their digital acumen


Posted by Andrea Derler on January 18, 2018.

The new world of work demands more than improving the digital skills of midlevel managers. HR must now turn its attention to CEOs and other top-level executives. While research1 shows that most organizations—7 out of 10—are doing a good job tailoring programs for first-, mid-, and senior-level leaders at their company, this focus on the center has left the top of the corporate pyramid less than ready for today’s fast-changing business environment. Just one-half of these same organizations have tailored programs for executives2, leaving C-suite teams to their own devices when it comes to boosting digital capabilities.

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Prediction 2: Accelerating digital transformation will force new leadership models


Posted by Josh Bersin on January 16, 2018.

According to Deloitte’s latest research with MIT, more than 70 percent of companies today are transforming their products and services into “digital businesses.”1 This doesn’t mean they are just building apps and installing new systems. They are realizing they must transform their products and services to become more digital in nature, which in turn creates a need to be more service-centric, agile, experimental, and data-driven. Additionally, a digital transformation demands new technical skills, skills in DevOps, and skills in user design, experience design, mobile applications, and other forms of web security and infrastructure.

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Organizational Network Analysis

Powering teams to better execute business strategy

Organizational Network Analysis

Posted by Tiffany McDowell, PhD and Don Miller on August 4, 2016.

Companies today are “living organizations” that must constantly adapt to market and industry pressures in order to stay competitive. This mode of continual change means they can no longer operate effectively in formal, rigid frameworks. Most executives recognize this shift—92 percent of surveyed leaders believe that redesigning their organization is either very important or important, and many are moving away from formal, functional structures and redesigning their organizations to be dynamic and team-based. Organizational Network Analysis (ONA) is a tool that can help manage living organizations to keep them agile and responsive to changes in the business environment.

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New Research: Changing business structure, dynamic roles, and new models of leadership top the Global Human Capital Trends for 2016


Posted by Josh Bersin on March 02, 2016

The new digital world of work is shaking the foundation of the world’s organizations: one of the biggest challenges companies now have is the need to fundamentally change the way they are structured.

This month we are launching our largest-ever study of talent challenges in business, the Deloitte Global Human Capital Trends 2016. More than 7,000 companies around the world took the time to answer our survey, and the findings were striking. While nearly every talent challenge from last year became more acute, the No. 1 topic on people’s minds is now “how do I organize my company to effectively meet the digital demands of today?”

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2015 Millennial Survey gives insight to inform leadership and talent agendas

2015 Millennial Survey

Understanding how Millennials perceive businesses and what they expect from them is critical to engaging and attracting this workforce of the future. More than 7,800 Millennials in 29 global emerging and developed markets contributed their views to Deloitte’s fourth annual Millennial Survey. Their responses reveal a mix of positive and negative perceptions about business, with this overarching message: Business needs to reset its purpose to attract Millennials.

The survey results suggest businesses, particularly in developed markets, need to make significant changes to attract and retain the future workforce. On the plus side: 73 percent of Millennials surveyed believe that businesses are having a positive impact. This was especially true in the emerging markets of Indonesia (98 percent), Philippines (91 percent), India (90 percent), China (89 percent), and Mexico (89 percent). However, the highest number of respondents reporting a negative business impact on society came from developed markets: Germany (66 percent), Belgium (59 percent), France (56 percent), Japan (55 percent), and Italy (44 percent).

Also on the plus side, 61 percent of respondents believe many businesses take a strong leadership position on issues that impact wider society—showing even stronger leadership on important social issues than governments. However, an overwhelming 75 percent of those surveyed also question businesses’ motivation, believing many focus on their own agendas rather than helping to improve society. Instead, respondents believe business should focus on people and purpose, not just products and profits.

“The message is clear: When looking at their career goals, today’s Millennials are just as interested in how a business develops its people and how it contributes to society as they are in its products and profits,” said Barry Salzberg, CEO of Deloitte Global. “These findings should be viewed as a wake-up call to the business community, particularly in developed markets, that they need to change the way they engage Millennial talent or risk being left behind.”

Only 28 percent of Millennials feel their current organization is making full use of their skills. More than half (53 percent) aspire to become the leader or most senior executive within their current organization, with a clear ambition gap between Millennials in emerging markets and developed markets. Sixty-five percent of emerging-market-based Millennials said they would like to achieve this goal, compared to only 38 percent in developed markets. This figure was also higher among men.

Additionally, the survey found large global businesses have less appeal for Millennials in developed markets (35 percent) compared to emerging markets (51 percent). Developed-market-based Millennials are also less inclined (11 percent) than Millennials in emerging markets (22 percent) to start their own business.

Other notable findings from the survey include:

  • Millennials want to work for organizations with purpose. For six in 10 Millennials, a “sense of purpose,” is part of the reason they chose to work for their current employers.
  • Technology, media, and telecommunications (TMT) are the most attractive employers. TMT ranked most desirable sector and the one to provide the most valuable skills according to Millennials. Men (24 percent) were nearly twice as likely as women (13 percent) to rank TMT as the number one sector to work in. Google and Apple top the list of businesses that most resonated with Millennials as leaders, each selected by 11 percent of respondents.
  • Confidence Gap? Millennial men more likely to pursue leadership. Millennial men were somewhat more likely to say they would like to secure the “top job” within their organization than women (59 percent vs. 47 percent). Women were also less likely to rank their leadership skills at graduation as strong; 27 percent of men vs. 21 percent of women rated this skill as strong. However, when asked what they would emphasize as leaders women were more likely to say employee growth and development (34 percent compared to 30 percent), an area that many Millennials felt was lacking within their current organizations.
  • Organizations and colleges must do more to nurture emerging leaders. When asked to estimate the contributions that skills gained in higher education made to achievement of their organization’s goals, Millennials’ average figure is 37 percent.
  • The changing characteristics of leadership. Today’s Millennials place less value on visible (19 percent), well-networked (17 percent), and technically skilled (17 percent) leaders. Instead, they define true leaders as strategic thinkers (39 percent), inspirational (37 percent), personable (34 percent) and visionary (31 percent).

“Millennials want more from business than might have been the case 50, 20, or even 10 years ago,” said Salzberg. “They are sending a very strong signal to the world’s leaders that when doing business, they should do so with purpose. The pursuit of this different and better way of operating in the 21st century begins by redefining leadership.”

To access the full report and explore infographics about the survey, please visit: www.deloitte.com/millennialsurvey.