Washington policy update: March 2020 Benefits and Compensation Bulletin

Posted by Robert Davis, Christine Drager, Maria Moliterno on March 27, 2020.

  • Supreme Court to Review Latest ACA Challenge: The Supreme Court has announced that it will review a 5th Circuit Court of Appeals ruling that the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) Individual Mandate is unconstitutional. In 2012, the Supreme Court ruled in a different case that Congress cannot require individuals to purchase health insurance, but nonetheless allowed the individual mandate to stand because it was a tax consistent with Congress’s taxing powers. In 2017, Congress amended the ACA to eliminate any penalty associated with the mandate, which prompted this latest lawsuit.  Basically, the argument is that the individual mandate without a penalty is not a tax, and thus is unconstitutional. The 5th Circuit Court of Appeals agreed, but refused to rule on the issue of whether the individual mandate could be severed from the rest of the ACA. If the Supreme Court upholds the 5th Circuit’s ruling and determines the individual mandate is not severable from the rest of the ACA, then the employer shared responsibility rules and group health plan mandates would be invalidated as well. A final decision is expected sometime in 2021.
  • GAO Issues report on Executive Retirement Plans:  The Government Accountability Office issued a report in January 2020 on the oversight of Executive Retirement Plans. Some employers sponsor retirement plans covering only a select group of employees. These types of plans are designed to ignore statutory limits on compensation and amount of benefits but at the same time do not include the same statutory protections offered for qualified private sector employer sponsored plans.
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Work disrupted, education disrupted

Posted by Robin Jones on March 25, 2020.

The pace of disruption caused by digital technologies in virtually every business sector is accelerating as AI and robotics gain ground in the enterprise. Cloud, mobile, and social computing have already driven workplace changes that have made the skills gap a pressing issue for managers. The rise of cognitive technologies adds urgency to the challenge of ensuring that employees have the talent and skills needed to create value. Robin Jones, principal in Deloitte Consulting LLP’s Human Capital Practice and Leader of it’s Workforce Transformation practice, recently sat down with MIT Sloan Management Review in an interview for a special collection on Developing the Future Ready – Resilient – Workforce. Robin starts by citing research, which shows that a majority of employers believe that at least half of their workforces will need to be reskilled for new jobs in the future.

“Work is being changed in some very fundamental ways,” says Jones. “Nearly all the work that we do will involve people working with either a smart machine or a robot. Many businesses are really challenged by this shift, even as they provide employee training and development. And educational institutions are a lagging indicator of this disruption. We need to think about the approaches we’re taking, the resources we’re investing, how quickly we’re moving, and [whether we are] fit for purpose. Are we asking the right questions when we’re thinking about this challenge of education and work disrupted?”

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Mind the gap: Rewiring the organizational approach to HR technology

Posted by Chris Havrilla on March 20, 2020.

Organizations put a lot of faith in HR technology. And collectively, they spend billions of dollars on it to drive change and generate value.1 But most organizations aren’t getting the value they expect. While almost 75 percent of respondents in Deloitte’s 2019 Global Human Capital Trends study rated HR technology as important or very important, just 6 percent believe their HR technology is “excellent.”2 That is a huge gap. In order to use technology effectively to help enable the transformation necessary to be competitive and meet the needs of the business, the workforce, and customers, organizations—and especially their HR leaders and technology professionals—need to act now to close this gap, or likely risk falling even further behind.

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Leading Practices for Remote Learning during COVID-19

Posted by Michael Griffiths, Julie Hiipakka and Elam Lantz on March 19, 2020.

The coronavirus outbreak is resulting in an ever-increasing list of companies, conferences and other engagements to turn to remote learning. For some organizations that already leverage remote  learning, this may not be a significant change. But for others whose rely on face-to-face collaboration, in-person knowledge sharing, or management by proximity, providing learning opportunities virtually may not come naturally.

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Social Distancing for COVID-19: Learning Technology to the Forefront

Posted by Michael GriffithsJason Magill, Richard Mitchell, Minoo Italia and Elam Lantz on March 19, 2020.

 

Serious businesswoman working late at computer in office

The impact that COVID-19 has had on peoples’ lives and work in recent days has been precipitous and significant. As organizations rise to meet the challenges associated with this disruption, one powerful strategy they can employ is leveraging the capabilities of digital learning technologies to enhance new ways of working and support business continuity by providing an engaging alternative to in-person programs.

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Your Cloud Journey does not have to end after Deployment

ind_TMT_glb_ho_2267_loPosted by Jeffery Hall , Martin Kamen  and Ramona Cheatham on March 18, 2020.

For many, cloud is no longer an option—it is becoming inevitable. But cloud strategies differ broadly based on the context of your organization. Organizations considering a move to cloud computing may need to embrace a different approach, and failing to establish a plan and framework for deployment may lead to challenging implementations. Drivers such as deployment planning, risk tolerance, and the way companies do business tend to predict your organization’s implementation pace and scope, as well as the technologies you need. Yet cloud strategies may not account for an organization’s cloud maturity level after deployment. When we talk about cloud maturity, we are trying to understand what organizations are doing after deployment.

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Supercharge your implementation through investments in mobile

Posted by Ramona Cheatham and Jeffery Hall on March 12, 2020.

Remember the old famous slogan “Don’t leave home without it?” This is what people are now doing with their mobile devices―no one is leaving home without them. In the beginning, they were a means for people to stay connected. They have far exceeded everyone’s expectations, having become a necessity for each and every generation, and it doesn’t stop there. Mobile devices play an important part for organizations when it comes to managing their employees. Between 2009 and 2010, companies felt a need to incorporate mobile devices into the work stream by implementing BYOD (“bring your own device”) for connecting to the corporate network. There were several benefits to this concept, including a boost in productivity from having employees use devices they were already familiar with. Having employees use their own devices also eliminated the need to buy each employee their device of choice.² This allowed for easy access to the organization’s applications and technology on the go. There are some disadvantages to mobile, including loss of data, loss of control, compatibility problems, risk of viruses, and additional IT support costs, which discourage companies from implementing these options. Let’s look at how Deloitte assessed the practice of implementing mobile in organizations.

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HR Technology’s Role in Activating a Diversity & Inclusion Strategy

Posted by Kathi Enderes, Matthew Shannon on March 6, 2020.

With multiple generations working together and virtual connectivity to talent across the globe, today’s workforce is more diverse than ever. Organizations have much to gain from tapping into this diversity of experience and perspectives. However, 9 out of 10 organizations we surveyed struggle to create an inclusive culture that leverages the power of that diversity to benefit the organization, the workforce, and customers.1

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Driving digital maturity with SaaS transformation – part 2

Posted by Akhand Singh and Jeffery Hall on March 5, 2020.

In Part 1 of the series, we looked at how digitally mature organizations deployed SaaS and explored what tactics worked well and what didn’t work as expected. Today, we will showcase what is recommended to be an implementation master and some leading practices that can be applied to your organization.

The way of the master: Winning with SaaS

Implementation Masters are organizations which possess outstanding ability to successfully implement a new technology. When comparing masters to non-masters, masters are much better at assessing the likely outcomes and communicating those to stakeholders across all key metrics than non-masters. In our survey, we found out that SaaS proved to exceed expectations of our masters in almost every SaaS success factor/area. Here are few key areas where the masters are succeeding:

  • Increased end user adoption
  • Decreased upfront implementation cost
  • Decreased IT expenditures
  • Integrated seamlessly with all existing solutions
  • Allowing for customization
  • Simplified change management

     

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